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Greenline commission 3 MW biogas-to-grid plant in Brandenburg

Greenline GmbH & Co. KG has completed and commissioned a 3 MW biogas plant in Brandenburg, Germany. Using arable feedstocks, the gas-to-grid plant features low energy consumption.

Steel enamel containers (left) for the fermentation and concrete containers for the post-fermentation or digestate storage (photo courtesy Greenline).

Steel enamel containers (left) for the fermentation and concrete containers for the post-fermentation or digestate storage (photo courtesy Greenline).

Germany-based Greenline GmbH & Co. KG, an engineering company specialised in designing, planning and construction of anaerobic digestion (AD) and gas utilisation plants has announced that it has completed and commissioned a 3 MW biogas plant in Brandenburg, Germany.

According to a statement, the gas-to-grid plant in Lenzen industrial zone, Brandenburg went into operation in June 2016. Greenline was the general planner of the biogas plant and it is operated by the biogas division of Osters & Voß GmbH, one of Germany’s largest agricultural contractors.

A total of about 56,000 tonnes of maize, grass silage and sugar beet are fermented annually in the plant and about 12 million Nm3 of biogas is upgraded by “organic-physical” purification and fed into the regional natural gas network of HanseWerk AG, formerly E.ON Hanse.

Low energy consumption

The concept utilises a combination of steel enamel containers for the fermentation and concrete containers for the post-fermentation or digestate storage. Thanks to the structural height, high-rise steel fermenters feature a high vertical natural convection and therefore low energy consumption.

In combination with a central agitator, even problematic substrates can, according to Greenline, be processed economically. The concrete containers as finishing components are very suitable as a combination for cost reasons.

In a newly constructed ready-mix concrete mobile silo, about 30 000 tonnes of substrates are stored. Vertical walls with U-shaped parts were used for chamber division. Poured asphalt was used as an acid-resistant top coating in the sugar beet chambers. The maize and grass silage feed system consists of a compact solids container whereas the sugar beet is fed into an acid-resistant stainless steel hopper screw.

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