Advertisement Advertisement
Advertisement Advertisement

Without a coherent framework investors will shun sustainable tech – trade bodies

Ahead of the trilogue negotiations on EU Taxonomy regulation, the bioenergy, agriculture and forest sectors stress the importance of a coherent and consistent legislative framework on the European legislator.
"We support the final objective of the sustainable finance regulation: to enable financial flows to support sustainable growth and transition to a carbon-neutral economy. Private investors need a sound regulation to support mitigation actions," the signatories write.

Freshly harvested forest fibre (spruce pulpwood in the foreground and sawlogs in the background) awaiting collection to begin its transformation process into sawn wood, pulp, paper, biochemical and bioenergy products. The harvested site will be replanted for the next generation forest cycle.

Freshly harvested forest fibre (spruce pulpwood in the foreground and sawlogs in the background) awaiting collection to begin its transformation process into sawn wood, pulp, paper, biochemical and bioenergy products. The harvested site will be replanted for the next generation forest cycle.

According to the signatories – Bioenergy Europe, Confederation of European Forest Owners (CEPF), Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI), Cogen Europe, European Farmers and European Agri-cooperatives (COPA & COGECA), European Biogas Association (EBA), European Organisation of the Sawmill Industry (EOS), European Renewable Ethanol Association (ePURE), Euroheat and Power and European State Forest Association (EUSTAFOR) – the final objective is undermined by a significant divergence between the recently approved sustainability requirements within the recast of the Renewable Energy Directive (REDII) and those of the Technical Expert Group’s (TEG) draft report on Sustainable Finance.

This lack of coherence “casts a shadow” over the likelihood of achieving long-term EU climate and energy goals. Representing a staggering 63 percent of the total renewable energy consumption, the signatories point out that bioenergy is the single largest renewable source in the European Union (EU).

Among other benefits, it greens industrial processes across sectors and currently covers over 8 percent of the EU’s industrial energy demand. Furthermore, the sector can grow sustainably in the next decades enabling the decarbonisation of the EU economy.

EU-wide, long-term sustainability criteria for the bioenergy sector and risk assessment systems can provide market stability; the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) has put in place such systems and market operators are gearing up to ensure compliance. As highlighted in Deforestation Communication, from 2021 bioenergy will be the only sector for which mandatory sustainability requirements apply.

A divergence from approved REDII sustainability requirements

According to the signatories, the technical screening criteria proposed by the Technical Expert Group (TEG) are not in line with the recently agreed legislation and unrealistic in the short term.

The forest and agriculture biomass sustainability requirements of REDII have been agreed in the context of a transparent and inclusive legislative process, their impact thoroughly assessed. They are based on a “Best Available Technology” (BAT) principle, stakeholders have been consulted, and the Council of the EU and European Parliament as co-legislators have scrupulously worked together towards a sound output.

To keep investments flowing in the direction of sustainable bioenergy projects and achieve EU climate and energy targets, the bioenergy industry, together with agriculture and forest biomass producers recommends an approach based on a progressive transition.

The sustainability technical criteria proposed in the Sustainable Finance Regulation should mirror the sustainability requirements agreed in REDII to maintain a sound investment environment. Only high indirect land-use change (ILUC) risk biofuels must be excluded by the TEG and any further requirement should be supported by an adequate assessment and the expertise of sector representatives duly considered.

Reaching a target is a matter of getting the trajectory right. The European climate and energy legislation already provides the tools to assess if results are on track and to fill gaps when needed. The sustainability requirements adopted by REDII should be implemented before opting for a new, untested, top-down designed set of requirements.

We're using cookies. Read more