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USIPA lauds UK Committee on Climate Change report

The United States Industrial Pellet Association (USIPA) has lauded a report from the United Kingdom (UK) Committee on Climate Change (CCC) citing biomass as a key renewable energy source to help the nation reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to net zero by 2050.
“Biomass in the form of renewable wood energy has displaced millions of tons of coal helping the UK reduce its carbon emissions for the sixth consecutive year,” said Seth Ginther, USIPA Executive Director.

Representing the interests of US industrial wood pellet producers and exporters, USIPA’s Executive Director Seth Ginther addressing delegates at the 2018 USIPA Exporting Pellets Conference. USIPA welcomes the new report from the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) stressing that Bioenergy Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) represents a “tremendous opportunity to further reduce emissions by generating carbon-negative electricity using 100 renewable feedstock.”

Released on May 2, 2019, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) report “Net Zero The UK’s contribution to stopping global warming” calls on the UK to end its contribution to global warming within 30 years and says the ambitious new target is achievable with known technologies and should be put into law as soon as possible.

Biomass in the form of renewable wood energy has displaced millions of tons of coal helping the UK reduce its carbon emissions for the sixth consecutive year, which are now at their lowest level since the 19th century. Bioenergy Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) represents a tremendous opportunity to further reduce emissions by generating carbon-negative electricity using 100 percent renewable feedstock. We look forward to working with our partners, as well as the CCC, to help the UK meet its emissions goals, commented Seth Ginther, USIPA’s Executive Director.

Along with wind and solar, renewable wood energy supplied by the United States (US) has become a vital part of the UK’s renewable energy mix over the last decade and is positioned for continued growth as a source of low-carbon baseload electricity.

The report reiterates previous CCC predictions that sustainable imports, including imports of wood pellets from the US, could increase biomass use up to 15 percent [up from 7 percent] of the country’s primary energy consumption by 2050.

Biomass is also anticipated to play a role in carbon sequestration efforts. The report calls for BECCS project to be deployed at scale no later than 2030. Further, it estimates BECCS could generate up to 173 TWh of electricity by 2050, capturing up to 51 million tonnes of carbon.

Currently, a pilot project is underway at Drax Power Station near Selby in North Yorkshire that is capturing one tonne of carbon per day. USIPA points out that scaling BECCS technology, like the Drax pilot, would enable carbon-negative power generation from 100 percent renewable feedstock.

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