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Shipping needs to cut CO2 emissions – ENVI delegation

As co-legislator with the EU Member States, the European Parliament passed legislation on the monitoring, reporting and verification of maritime greenhouse gas emissions. The regulation entered into force in July 2015 and became operational in 2018.
"Clearly, at IMO, there are two opposing directions regarding shipping climate negotiations," said José Inácio Faria one of the MEPs participating in the 72th session of the Marine Environment Protection committee in London, UK.

Deployment of all currently known technologies could make it possible to almost completely decarbonise maritime shipping by 2035, according to a new report published by the International Transport Forum (ITF) at the OECD.

A delegation of MEPs from the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) is participating in the 72th session of the Marine Environment Protection committee (MEPC72) of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in London, UK.

The delegation is composed of MEPs José Inácio Faria (EPP, PT, Co-chair), Jytte Guteland(S&D, SV, Co-chair) and Dubravka Šuica (EPP, HR). MEPs will meet shipping industry and NGO representatives, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim, MEPC Chair Hideaki Saito, representatives from major flag states, and participate in working groups and MEPC72 plenary meetings.

Some countries wish to set ambitious goals, such as the majority of EU Member States. Then there are others who wish to lower the standards for values that represent a backward step, even if we take into consideration the Paris Agreement goals. The aim to have zero emissions by 2050 needs bold decisions and commitment today. The Paris Agreement commits parties to taking economy-wide action in order to limit an increase in pre-industrial temperatures to 1.5°C, which is well below 2°C. This means that action on shipping emissions is as much a part of this commitment as any other sector of the economy.  The EU position needs to stand firm so that results don’t fall short of the proposed objectives like in previous editions of IMO. That is why four MEPs have signed an open letter to the EU Member-States upholding the EU priorities for this MEPC, said José Inácio Faria.

As co-legislator with the EU Member States, the European Parliament (EP) passed legislation on the monitoring, reporting and verification, the so-called “MRV regulation”, of maritime greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The regulation entered into force in July 2015 and became operational in 2018.

When introducing the MRV proposal in 2013, the European Commission (EC) indicated that a reduction target and implementing measures, including market-based measures (MBMs), would follow.

To meet the targets of the Paris Agreement, all sectors of society must do their part. I expect the IMO to finally show the world that it intends to go from climate laggard to an active contributor to the common effort to combat climate change. This requires a progressive Initial GHG Strategy but also firm immediate and medium-term action to curb the shipping sector’s GHG emissions. The EU needs to remain firm and united in supporting a 2050 target of 70 to 100 percent reduction of GHG emissions, said Jytte Guteland.

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