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Preem and Sirius investing in cleaner tankers

Sweden's largest oil refiner, renewable fuels producer and retailer Preem AB and Sirius Shipping AB are one step closer to reducing the environmental impact of maritime transportation emissions as Sirius heads to Shanghai, China to name the latest addition to its oil and chemical tanker fleet.

The 7 999 dwt MT Mercurius is an oil and chemical tanker that is being built for Sirius Shipping by AVIC Dingheng shipyard in China. The second vessel in the “Evolution” series, it was launched at the end of August (photo courtesy Sirius).

The vessel meets high standards of safety, quality, and efficiency, with a strong focus on long-term sustainability and low environmental impact. Among other things, the ship has a hull design and efficient machine, which results in lower fuel consumption and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. MT Mercurius is also prepared to run on liquid natural gas (LNG) for a future LNG infrastructure, said Jonas Backman, CEO of Sirius Shipping.

The tanker will be long-term leased by Preem for deliveries to the company’s depots and customers in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. The Swedish flagged ship will be delivered to Preem at the end of March 2019 and will have its home harbour at Donsö in the Gothenburg archipelago.

We are very pleased with the choice of the new environmentally adapted tanker. Preem’s maritime transport is a major and important part of the company’s operations. Therefore, as in all procurements, we have attached great importance to the ship’s compliance with high sustainability requirements, said Fredrik Backman, Head of Shipping Department at Preem.

Preem’s maritime transport applies “slow steaming”, which means that the ships adjust speed to minimize the time of anchorage at refineries and ports. This contributes to lower fuel consumption, increased safety, and the least possible environmental impact.

An artist’s rendering of Sirius Shipping’s the new environmentally adapted oil and chemical tanker (image courtesy Sirius).

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