All subjects
Research & Development

World’s biggest terrestrial carbon sinks found in young forests – new BIFoR study

More than half of the carbon sink in the world’s forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young – under 140 years old – rather than in tropical rainforests. These trees have typically ‘regrown’ on land previously used for agriculture, or cleared by fire or harvest and it is their young age that is one of the main drivers of this carbon uptake, new research at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom (UK) shows.

An error occurred

You are logged in as subsbriber at Bioenergy International, but something is wrong.

On your profile you can see what subscriptions you have access to and more information.

Is some of the information wrong – please contact our customer service.

Please reload the page

We could not ascertain if you are logged in or not. Please reload this page.
Bioenergy International premium

Do you want to read the whole article?

Only logged in payed subscribers can read all contents on bioenergyinternational.com
As an subscriber you get:
  • Six editions per year
  • Full access to all digital content
  • The E-magazine Bioenergy international
  • And more ...
More than half of the carbon sink in the world’s forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young – under 140 years old – rather than in tropical rainforests. These trees have typically ‘regrown’ on land previously used for agriculture, or cleared by fire or harvest and it is their young age that is one of the main drivers of this carbon uptake, new research at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom (UK) shows.

Forests are widely recognised as important carbon sinks – ecosystems capable of capturing and storing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) – but dense tropical forests, close to the equator have been assumed to be working the hardest to soak up these gases.

Researchers at the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR), University of Birmingham in the UK have carried out a fresh analysis of the global biosphere using a new combination of data and computer modelling in a new European Commission funded study titled “Role of forest regrowth in global carbon sink dynamic” published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

Drawing on data sets of forest age, they were able to show the amount of carbon uptake between 2001 and 2010 by old, established areas of forest. They compared this with younger expanses of forest which are re-growing across areas that have formerly experienced human activities such as agriculture or logging or natural disturbances such as fire.

Significant age-effect in high latitude forests

Previously it had been thought that the carbon uptake by forests was overwhelmingly due to fertilisation of tree growth by increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, the researchers found that areas, where forests were re-growing, sucked up large amounts of carbon not only due to these fertilisation effects but also as a result of their younger age.

The age effect accounted for around 25 percent of the total CO2 absorbed by forests. Furthermore, this age-driven carbon uptake was primarily situated not in the tropics, but in the middle and high latitude forests.

These forests include, for example, areas of land in America’s eastern states, where settlers established farmlands but then abandoned them to move west towards the end of the 19th century. The abandoned land became part of the US National Forest, along with further tracts abandoned during the Great Depression in the 1930s.

Other significant areas of forest re-growth include boreal forests of Canada, Russia, and Europe, which have experienced substantial harvest activity and forest fires. Large-scale reforestation programmes in China are also making a major contribution to this carbon sink.

It’s important to get a clear sense of where and why this carbon uptake is happening, because this helps us to make targeted and informed decisions about forest management, explained Dr Tom Pugh, of the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR),

The research highlights the importance of forests in the world’s temperate zone for climate change mitigation but also shows more clearly how much carbon these re-growing forests can be expected to take up in the future. This is particularly important because of the transient nature of re-growth forest: once the current pulse of forest re-growth works its way through the system this important part of the carbon sink will disappear, unless further reforestation occurs.

The amount of CO2 that can be taken up by forests is a finite amount: ultimately reforestation programmes will only be effective if we simultaneously work to reduce our emissions, said Dr Pugh.

Most read on Bioenergy International

Get the latest news about Bioenergy

Subscribe for free to our newsletter
Sending request
I accept that Bioenergy International stores and handles my information.
Read more about our integritypolicy here