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Bright Biomethane to supply biogas upgrading tech to Twence

The Netherlands-headed biogas upgrading specialists Bright Biomethane, part of bioenergy technology specialists HoSt, has announced that it has been selected to supply its biogas upgrading system to the Dutch municipal energy and waste management company Twence for a large biogas project being developed at Elhorst-Vloedbelt near the village of Zenderen, located in the eastern part of the country.

Bright Biomethane, part of bioenergy technology specialists HoSt, has been selected to supply its biogas upgrading system to the Dutch waste management company Twence for a large biogas project being developed at Elhorst-Vloedbelt near the village of Zenderen, located in the eastern part of the Netherlands (photo courtesy Bright Biomethane).

At Elhorst-Vloedbelt, a former landfill site, 250 000 tonnes of pig manure will soon be converted into biogas and raw materials in a manure biogas plant. In the final step, the biogas will be upgraded to biomethane in Bright’s biogas upgrading system with a capacity of 1 000 Nm3 of biomethane per hour. This is comparable to the annual gas consumption of approximately 3 000 households.

We supply and build our systems worldwide. Even for locations without gas infrastructure, Bright offers a (virtual pipeline) solution. It is a positive development that our technology is also being used more and more regionally. We are excited that Twence, as a forerunner in promoting the circular economy, is working with Bright to contribute to the regional and national energy transition, said Maarten Holtkamp, Sales Director at Bright Biomethane.

The renewable natural gas (RNG) will then be distributed to homes and business premises via Coteq Netbeheer’s existing natural gas network.

Closer regional cooperation is essential for Twence in making the region more sustainable and promoting regional employment. We are very pleased with the collaboration with Bright. A company that offers proven, well-developed technology for producing renewable natural gas from residual streams, said Harry Hegeman, Project Leader at Twence.

Greening gas supply

The Dutch government is promoting the transition from fossil fuels to sustainable energy sources with the goal of an almost completely sustainable energy supply by 2050.

Developing a sustainable existing built environment, biomethane is the most efficient route. The infrastructure is in place and it is a readily available step for a soon-to-be natural gas-free gas grid. In addition, manure digestion in combination with biomethane production provides an emission reduction effect. The methane from manure is put to good use by producing renewable natural gas. This way, the methane is not released into the atmosphere. The manure does not remain in the stables and goes to the manure digester as fresh as possible, said Maarten Holtkamp.

Another advantage of biomethane from manure is the high regional and national availability of manure and the flexibility of this energy source.

Flexible gas grid

The biomethane reaches the end-user through the existing gas grid. Coteq Netbeheer, the network operator is currently investing in the gas network to be able to feed in as much sustainable green gas as possible, even in the summer when gas consumption is low

The gas network can supply almost 10 times more energy than the electricity grid. Therefore we expect the gas network to continue to be used in the future, for example, to provide sufficient energy for the cold days we had last week. This project is another nice contribution to this transition, said Henk Engberts, asset management consultant at Coteq Netbeheer.

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