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Synkero to build commercial aviation e-fuel facility in the Port of Amsterdam

Synkero, a new Dutch project development start-up, has announced that it aims to develop a commercial plant for the production of synthetic sustainable aviation fuel (SAF). Using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) and green hydrogen the electro-fuel (e-fuel) plant will be located in the Port of Amsterdam which has an existing kerosene pipeline to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport (AMS).

Synkero, a new Dutch project development start-up, has announced that it aims to develop a commercial plant for the production of synthetic sustainable aviation fuel (SAF). Using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) and green hydrogen the 50 000 tonnes-per-annum electro-fuel (e-fuel) plant will be located in the Port of Amsterdam which has an existing kerosene pipeline to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport (image courtesy Synkero).

The current generation aircraft engines require liquid fuels and cannot switch to alternative energy sources such as hydrogen or electricity in the short term. Sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) is, therefore, seen as the solution to drastically reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in aviation.

It is also is a ‘drop-in’ fuel, meaning that pure SAF can be mixed with fossil kerosene. No further modifications to infrastructure or equipment are required.

Launched during the European Conference for Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) on February 8, 2021, Synkero is a project development start-up that together with partners Port of Amsterdam, Royal Schiphol Group, SkyNRG, and air carrier KLM Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM).

As a sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) user, KLM welcomes initiatives that contribute to the further development of SAF. In 2019, KLM released Fly Responsibly, through which we commit to creating a more sustainable future for aviation. A cornerstone in our approach is to scale up SAF and its use. There are still many challenges in the field of synthetic kerosene, including the technology, the availability of green power, and obtaining CO2 from the air. This is why we have been working for some time with Synkero to help with research, and accelerating developments, said Jurrian de Jonge, Director Fuel, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines.

Synthetic SAF

Several technologies currently exist to produce SAF. One of these technologies is the synthetic route. As a feedstock, this ‘electro-fuel’ (e-fuel) uses CO2 from unavoidable industrial processes or the air directly. The CO2 is then converted to SAF through a chemical process in combination with green hydrogen.

Worldwide people, businesses, and countries are connected through aviation. To pass on that pleasure to future generations, we need to get rid of carbon. Our goal is a net-zero aviation sector in 2050. To achieve that, the development of sustainable aviation fuels is essential. With Synkero, we are taking the next step, Dick Benschop, CEO of Royal Schiphol Group.

According to Synkero, synthetic SAF is sustainable in all aspects and does not contribute to further unsustainable practices such as displaced land use and deforestation. This route of producing SAF is also scalable and integral in making aviation more sustainable.

To keep the world habitable, it is paramount that aviation also becomes sustainable. However, it is also one of the most challenging sectors to make emission-free. Cooperation, technical innovation, and European policy are all crucial for this. Therefore, we are delighted to have founded Synkero and, in close cooperation with our various partners, to take the next steps towards building a factory for the production of sustainable aviation fuel, said Joost Brinkman, Managing Director of Synkero.

Synkero will focus on realizing the commercial synthetic SAF plant in the Port of Amsterdam, which has an existing kerosene pipeline to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport (AMS). The plant is scheduled to be completed in 2027, and Synkero’s ambition is to produce 50 000 tonnes of SAF annually.

The project will also seek to connect with sustainable initiatives in the North Sea Canal area, such as the Hermes project.

Making aviation more sustainable is very important for the region and the Netherlands. A factory in our port that produces SAF in a circular way fits seamlessly with our new four-year strategy to be a leader in the energy transition. This is a great initiative, and we are proud to be part of this great transition, said Koen Overtoom, CEO, Port of Amsterdam.

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